Thursday, April 30, 2015

Wildflowers at Home and on the Farm

Wisconsin's wildflowers are really coming up now. In my neighborhood, it's mostly violets and gill-over-the-ground (this blog's namesake). On my friend's farm in Grant County, there's much more.

Gill-over-the-ground
Gill-over-the-Ground

Also known as "Creeping Charlie," Gill-over-the-ground is a fragrant member of the mint family -- and it's edible. These gorgeous purple flowers are all over in suburban lawns right now, along with white and purple violets.

Violet
Violet

Violet

Aside from a few white flowers I've spotted in a forest area near school, those were the only wildflowers I was seeing. Then I went to my friend's farm. His place is covered in violets too. He said he's been eating them.

Violet

Violets

The remaining flower pics aren't great. Here's why:

Jill the Horse
Jill the horse

We rode his horses, and I grabbed shots of many flowers from the back of the horse, which was not easy.

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Bloodroot, Sanguinaria canadensis

Rue Anenome
Rue Anenome

Rue Anenome
Rue Anenome

Buttercup
Buttercup - I'm not sure which kind. Best guesses are Ranunculus hispidus or Ranunculus repens.

I found a few others after dismounting the horse.

Dutchman's Breeches
Dutchman's Breeches

Dutchman's Breeches

Bumble Bee on Dutchman's Breeches

Large-flowered Bellwort
Large flowered Bellwort, a.k.a. Merry bells

Large-flowered Bellwort

Large-flowered Bellwort

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Some kind of buttercup

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Something cruciferous?

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American Pasqueflower, Anenome patens

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Wisconsin's First Spring Wildflowers

We've got Blue-Eyed Grass and Crocuses. It's not much, but it's better than snow.

Blue-Eyed Grass

Blue-Eyed Grass

Blue-Eyed Grass

Blue-Eyed Grass

Blue Eyed Grass

Crocuses

Crocus

Crocuses

Crocuses

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Sunday, April 12, 2015

Spring Wildflowers on El Cajon Mountain

I first hiked El Cajon Mountain on June 1, 2014. I knew the trail by its reputation as a nasty, difficult trail that goes up and down steep slopes for 11 miles with hot temperatures and no shade. It's located in El Capitan Open Space Preserve in Lakeside, CA. What I did not expect when I arrived was the spectacular wildflower display.

El Cajon Mountain
El Cajon Mountain

(Note: If you do plan to hike El Cajon Mountain, start as early in the morning as you can and bring at least 5 liters of water and some snacks. Some people do this hike in 4 hours, but I do it in around 6 or more. The temperatures are beastly by 10:30am or so.)

Now that I knew about the flowers, I was determined to go back. Last summer I went up it three times (twice without my camera), and I saw scarlet larkspur, woolly blue curls, a humboldt lily, western azaleas, and more. So what blooms on El Cajon Mountain during the peak of wildflower season, in early April?

My out of shape arse only made it 2.5 miles up the trail (and back down again, which is no small task in this case), but here is what I saw:

Parry's Phacelia
Parry's Phacelia

Parry's Phacelia
Parry's Phacelia

Best guess: Gazania linearis (Treasure Flower)
Gazania, an escaped garden flower originally from South Africa that is naturalized in San Diego county

Cape Marigold
Cape Marigold, another African garden escape

Indian Pink
An Indian Pink, one of my favorites, and only the second one I've ever seen

Blue Dicks (a.k.a. Wild Hyacinth)
Blue Dicks, a very common flower but one I find difficult to photograph because they are on long, thin stems, always blowing in the wind. I am very pleased with myself for this shot. This flower has an edible corm, which the Kumeyaay Indians traditionally ate.

The next flower deserves an introduction. Fire poppies tend to bloom after a fire. To the best of my knowledge, El Cajon Mountain burned in the 2003 Cedar Fire but it has not burned since. I wasn't looking for or expecting to see a fire poppy there. My flower book says fire poppies have four petals, and this flower has six. But it's a dead ringer for a fire poppy, aside from the lack of fire and the six petals. There's another type of poppy that looks similar called a wind poppy, but wind poppies have "distinctively purple" stamens and this flower does not. So I think it's an actual fire poppy! Hooray!

Fire Poppy?
A fire poppy!

Chaparral Yucca
The ubiquitous chaparral yucca, Hesperoyucca whipplei, a.k.a. Our Lord's Candle

Ceanothus
Beautiful and sweet smelling ceanothus

Bush Poppy
Bush poppy - there are entire bushes covered in these

Nuttall Snapdragon
Nuttall Snapdragon

Nuttall Snapdragon
Nuttall Snapdragon

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Best guess: Hooked Skunkweed, Navarretia hamata, in the Phlox family.

Monkeyflower
Monkeyflower

California Poppies, Cryptantha, and Blue Dicks
Lots of California poppies, cryptantha, and blue dicks

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Silver Puffs

California Poppies and Owl's Clovers
California Poppies and Owl's Clovers

Owl's Clover and California Poppy
Owl's Clover and California Poppy

Owl's Clover
Owl's Clover

Monkeyflowers
Monkeyflowers

Monkeyflower
Monkeyflower